Manny trying to be Money

Even in the final hours of the Manny trade fiasco last July, I was embattled with myself as to whether or not I truly wanted to see the Red Sox lose the HOF slugger.

As is typical with myself and most sports fans, at the end of the day you get on with your life and love your team for who they are, not necessarily who they were just hours before. Thus, I wished him well and good-riddance at the same time.

In light of everything that came out through the Red Sox media relations and Boston media, combined with Manny’s “miraculous” recovery from his “Boston injuries,” I feel I don’t need an explanation from Manny, but would still be interested in hearing his side of the story.

Well, up until today.

In the last 24 hours, the Dodgers, seemingly the only team interested in giving Manny a contract worth anything even halfway resembling the sluggers wildest dreams, gave him basically a take-it-or-leave-it offer, at one year for $25M.

What does Manny do?

I’m guessing he phoned in from somewhere like manny Pictures, Images and Photos‘>this

just to say: Thanks but no thanks.

To any other GMs paying attention, if this isn’t the clearest sign as to Manny’s intentions, you may want to start looking for another job in another organization, like Burger King or Starbucks.

Manny has one reason and one reason only for saying no to this contract offer.

He doesn’t want to play hard. He doesn’t want to need to play a full season at the pace he played for LA last August & September. Frankly, he doesn’t want to play a full season, period.

Manny’s not stupid. He knows he’s among the best the game’s ever seen. You don’t think he saw what Roger Clemens was able to get with Houston and later the Yankees, with all kinds of personal clauses in the contract and think, hey, I can do that too?

By getting a 4-6 year deal at $25M/year, Manny obviously would have the liberty in finishing his career in Manny style, which may or may not include actually playing baseball.

Instead, what he sees the Dodgers offering, is a one year deal that would essentially prove to the baseball world what we already knew, he tanked on the Sox last year.

How would we know? Because his one-year contract would force him to play like this (.396 AVG, .489 OBP, .743 SLG, 1.232 OPS) for another FULL season before sending him back into the free agent market where he gets ANOTHER contract.

Most players have good seasons right before becoming free agents and Manny in many ways would be just like every other player entering a free agent year. He’d be more encouraged to play harder to get his money.

Of course his problem is 162 games is an eternity in Manny-time. That’s not even enough time to wash those “well-kept” dreadlocks more than once or twice. Not enough time to count how much money he can pile up on his bed. Not enough time to even find special places in Dodger stadium to take a leak.

Manny doesn’t care about his team. He cares about one thing and one thing only, Manny. While that’s not entirely bad, there are millions of other people like him around the world, He’s in the enviable position of being one of the best baseball players to ever have put on a uniform, but that doesn’t matter because he doesn’t want to play the game. 

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3 comments

  1. juliasrants

    I was a very happy Red Sox fan when Manny got traded last year. The way he quit on the team; stood there and took 3 straight pitches without lifting his bat? Somehow you can’t help but think that Manny is getting what he deserves. Thanks for the shout out in your link list! I’ll be happy to return the favor!

    Julia
    http://werbiefitz.mlblogs.com/

  2. badseed57

    Kaybee,
    As much as I want this to blow up in Boras’ face, I still enjoy watching Manny play and will be somewhat disappointed if he doesn’t get a contract somewhere.

    Julia,
    The hardest part of Manny getting dealt away last year was explaining it to my four year old daughter as he was her favorite player. She still asks if he’s ever going to be a Red Sox again.

    –Ben

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